No Indoor, No Problem: Riding in the Snow

SURE, THOSE PEOPLE IN WELLINGTON MAY BE HOT, BUT THEY ARE MISSING OUT ON THE JOYS OF THEIR SNOW RIDING.
I recently went on my first trip to the snow. Well, using indoor and covered riding spaces assisted (the previous one was heated). Snow, until today, was only an inconvenience.

But life on the bunny farm means if I am waiting for ideal road conditions again, I will not be in the saddle until, oh, April. Listed below are a couple of considerations, in addition to personal observations about drifting in the snow.horse riding iceland

IT IS DEEP.

I mean, perhaps this really is a no-brainer, but to get a first-time snow driver I needed to remind myself of the fact when requesting Red to perform anything longer than plod through drifts in a Sit walk. The identical way that you are quickly out of breath after slogging through snow, your horse will probably tire from all that work. Combine this with chilly temperatures and you have possible to overwork your horse in freezing atmosphere or make him then chilled. He is likely to max out in the snow before somebody on a 17-hand warmblood will even detect.

ROUTINE SHOES?

Snow can match in shod hooves and protrude as much as a couple of inches, which means that the horse is hobbling and slipping around like he has billiard balls for toes –maybe not enjoyable, not secure! If your horse will not have to remain shod for winter, think about buying into snow rims–specific rim pads may prevent snow from balling up. You might even add barium for additional traction in the snow: processors of this super-hard barium are welded on the shoe, making areas of traction. Just make sure you plan ahead in late fall when booking the farrier.

EVALUATION THE SNOW TO BEGIN WITH TO BE CERTAIN THAT THERE’S NO ICE CRUST.
Ouch! When there’s a crust of ice on the outside or a couple of layers down, then leave your horse at the barn now –he will not love riding in that, also when it is sharp, he could injure himself.

MOVE WITH CARE.

It’s true that you may be riding the identical trail you ride daily and you may typically have the ability to navigate it off –but when you’ve dropped a lot of snow on top of anything, it will become unrecognizable. Little things like stones and sticks are imperceptible, and even scarier challenges such as holes and ditches could be impossible to see. Do not go out in a trot or a canter unless you are confident that you are on good earth under that snow. Case in point: I understood there was a dry creek ditch somewhere on the peak of the mountain where I had been riding the other day, also Red understood it but we disagreed about where it had been. Red wound up standing up to his torso at a slough and needed to suck and leap to spare himself. Winter isn’t a fantastic time to go exploring new paths that you have never ridden before.

APPEAR UP.

If you are like me and you’ve got difficulty remembering to look upward, snow riding may heal you in about thirty minutes. I trotted my horse over a previously-untouched pasture another day and gave me complete vertigo for a few minutes by looking down in the floor. Without visual landmarks to split up that white, I was completely disoriented. Eyes on the horizon, most individuals.

SIT AND REVEL IN THE RIDE.

After I was finally comfortable we were not likely to fall to a giant hole concealed beneath the snow, then Red wouldn’t bog down in a ramble and that there wasn’t any ice lurking to cut off his thighs into ribbons, I actually enjoyed snow riding. The sense of riding in the snow differs from simply riding down the road my horse lifts his legs higher to clean the surface, although we are moving in a fantastic pace everything feels slowed down again. In the snow, I will see indications of additional winter residents (rabbit paths, mice paths, the ideal wing sighting in which a fish took flight.) It is silent, it is calm, and also for a couple of minutes it actually seems like we are the only things outside here in the fantastic white expanse.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *